How to Fertilize Succulents + 7 Best Fertilizers for Succulents

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Succulents are tough plants. They’ve evolved to survive harsh desert environments with dry air and minimal rainfall, so it’s safe to say that they don’t need much to get by. However, as decorative houseplants, you may want to try and take a little extra care to get them to develop the thick, fleshy leaves that make them so beautiful. One of the best ways to do this is by using the right fertilizer.

This article will guide you through everything you should know about fertilizing succulents. From which products to use to how often to use them, so let’s get started!

7 Best Succulent Fertilizers

1. Miracle-Grow Succulent Plant Food

This product is easily among the best fertilizers available for a wide variety of succulents. The liquid fertilizer is fast-acting and will show improvement in now time. The Bottle has an easy to use design with a pump that allows you to measure the amount of fertilizer necessary to use.

Miracle grow is also quite  a well-known brand, making it pretty reliable.

2. EarthPods Premium Cactus & Succulent Plant Food

Earth pod uses an organic mixture of trace minerals, nutrients, and growth hormones to stimulate strong succulent growth. Each tube comes with 100 concentrated earth pods, enough to supply a single succulent or a group of succulents up to six years.

The application is super easy. All you need to do is push one earth pod into the soil near the base of the plant. For a small succulent, one or two seeds will do. For a medium-sized one .use two to four and for a sizeable succulent use four to eight pods. After your done placing the pods, all you need to do next is water.

Another great thing about this product is its eco-friendly container, which is made 100 percent sustainably in the USA.

3. Cute farms succulent, Cacti, Aloe Fertilizer

As its name suggests, this formula composes of nutrients and minerals targeted explicitly towards healthy succulent growth. The bottle comes with 8 ounces of fertilizer, which, when used monthly, should last you up to one whole year.

For effective results, it’s recommended to spray near the roots, right before watering. Cute farms succulent comes with a sprayer, which should make the whole process super convenient and easy.

4. Aquatic Arts Succulent Fertilizer

This fertilizer contains natural ingredients aimed at ensuring healthy and robust plant growth. It is gentle and safe to use on a variety of succulents, including Cacti, echeveria, and aloe. The formula also consists of a healthy amount of potassium, which is a mineral that helps succulents fend of disease and develop strong, healthy roots.

Applying this product to your plant is a straightforward procedure. All you have to do is mix one teaspoon of the formula with two cups of water.

5. Espoma Company Organic Indoor Plant Food

Indoor succulents miss out on all the microbial benefits of the outside world. With this fertilizer, you can change that and get your succulent to grow to its full potential. Response company organic indoor plant food is rich in microbes that build up the soil and offer your plant a more natural soil environment.

Like any organic fertiliser, its gentle and chemical free, ensuring you never accidently burn your succulents.

6. Organic worms

If you’re not afraid of getting a little messy, worms are a fantastic fertilizer you can use to grow your succulents. Worms release worms castings, a nutrient-rich waste that contains all the necessary components a plant needs to prosper.

Worm castings’ plant beneficial properties don’t end there; they are also used to balance the PH of soil. A balanced soil ph will enable your succulent to absorb nutrients better and speed up its growth and development. 

7. Manure tea

Manure tea is an excellent form of fertilizer for succulents, and best of all, its 100 percent organic. This method of fertilizing is far simpler than using traditional compost and manure fertilizer. It lets you get all the necessary nutrients into your plant without the added mess or smell.

To prepare the mixture, remove a single teabag from the packaging and place it in a 5 gallon bucket. Next, fill the bucket with 1-5 gallons of water depending on your need. Once you’re done, cover the bucket with a lid and leave it for 2-3 days, after which you can remove the teabag and use the mixture as fertilizer. The best thing about manure tea is that it’s fast-acting and gentle enough as to not burn your succulents.

The perfect NPK ratio

NPK, which stands for Nitrogen, Phosphorous, and potassium, refers to the three macro-nutrients essential for healthy plant growth. Each nutrient works differently and contributes to separate aspects of plant developments.

Nitrogen (N) is the primary driver of plant growth, and is what gives them their thick bright leaves.

Phosphorous (P) enables healthy root growth as well as the development of fruit and flowers.

Potassium (K) is a vital component of a plants overall biological functions.it helps development  by moving  water and nutrients around the plant, ensuring each part gets what it needs.

Every fertilizer comes with a three-digit NPK label, which is used to indicate the ratio in which these three macro-nutrients are combined.

Succulents do best with gentler fertilizer, so a highly diluted strength of all-purpose balanced fertilizer should serve them well. Look for a fertilizer with an NPK of 5-5-5.

For the best results you can get a succulent specific fertiliser with an NPK of 2-3-2.

Chemical or organic-which fertilizer is better?

Chemical fertilizers work much faster than organic ones, which can make them tempting to go for, especially for new plant owners. However, this fast-action mechanism can be a little too much for succulents, burning their roots and scarring their leaves.

Organic fertilizers offer succulents a more natural soil environment, allowing the plant to absorb all the necessary nutrients and minerals at its own pace. If you don’t have many options and are forced to work with chemical fertilizer, check to see whether it has a low NPK and be sure to dilute it a little just in case.

Another significant thing to remember is never to use a fertilizer formulated for lawn care on your succulents. These fertilizers have very high nitrogen content, aimed to speed up growth. For plants, this can be very dangerous.

When to use fertilizer?

Succulents aren’t fertilizer hungry plants, so you don’t need to fertilize them too often. Succulents have a dormant season from fall till spring. For the best results, it’s better to use fertilizer as the plants enter their active growth period, which for most species is early spring and late summer.

How often your succulent should be fertilized depends mainly on the type of fertilizer you choose to use. Some products are designed to release nutrients slowly over a long period, while others work much faster in smaller doses. 

If you’re following the plant’s natural cycle, as mentioned earlier, applying a single dose of extended-release-fertilizer in early spring should suffice. If you don’t witness much improvement, your succulent may need a second application in the late summer season.

Be careful not to overdo it and fertilize your succulent too frequently. These plants are robust and are likely to do better without any fertilizer rather than with too much fertilizer. Infact, giving a succulent more fertilizer than necessary may burn or even kill it.

Well, there you have it! With this guide, you should have no trouble growing bright, healthy succulents. Each plant is different, and so is the environment, so it’s essential to keep an eye out for what works best for your succulent. Overall the average succulent is durable little thing, and a small trial and error shouldn’t cost you too much.

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