How to Care for Succulent Plants in Pots Without Drainage

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Succulents are suppose to dry their roots immediately and briskly.

They don’t prefer to sit in water for more than a day or two and will commence rotting if succulents are stayed wet for a lengthy period.

This is why it is highly recommended to use pots with a drainage hole when one is about to commence growing out succulents.

However, if one is growing succulents indoors, it is more preferable that one should opt for a pot without a drainage hole so that one can keep up with succulents on the counter and not worry about water coming out the bottom of the pot.

Let it be informed to all of you that there some simple procedure to make watering succulents in pots without a drainage hole convenient.

Well-draining soil

Usage of a well-draining soil is exceptionally essential for pots without drainage because it permits for more airflow. Furthermore, water still has nowhere to flow out. It is convenient for the water to evaporate if the soil has large particles.

It is generally preferred to use the gritty mix from Bonsai Jack. However, one can also frequently use pumice in glass containers. The pumice tends to look a little tidier in the glass. Adding colossal materials to the bottom is a way that people frequently “add drainage” to a pot. However, this veraciously incurs problems for succulents because it causes water to pool at the bottom of the pot. Then, the soil at the top of the pot traps the water in making it harder for the water to evaporate.

Measure it out

One of the biggest problems with a non-draining pot is knowing how much water one has poured in. Glass containers are great assistance because one can see the water level as they are pouring the water on.

However, this isn’t the case with many non-draining planters.

It is recommended to measure out the amount of water one has poured on their plants.

One can do this in an enormous ways. The simplest is to use a measuring cup, which one is  likely to have at home.

Another incredible option is the squeeze bottle from the garden tools set. It has measurements on the side so one can assess how much water is in the bottle.

How much water

The most trickiest part about watering succulents without drainage is knowing how much water it needs.

The target is to pour on sufficient water that all the soil gets wet but having excess water pool at the bottom of the pot.

If one pours on abundant water, then one can use a rag or paper towels to try and absorb some of it. If one’s pot is exceptionally tiny, one may be able to pour the excess water off.

Different soil types retain different amounts of water, so even after one decides on a volume of water to give succulents, they’ll need to be aware of symptoms of watering problems.

It is suggested that pouring on water equal to half the volume of one’s planter. So, if one’s planter holds about a cup of soil, they’ll pour on 1/2 cup of water.

Use this as a commencing point and, again, adjust as needed based on what plant is saying over the next few weeks. The amount of water one use and the frequency of watering both mutually will determine how healthy one’s succulent is.

How often to water

Water only when the soil is completely dry.

RULES FOR PLANTING: POTS WITHOUT DRAINAGE HOLES

A little bit of water goes a long way

Every drop of water that is added by the planter to the pot is going to stay in there. Whereas people usually recommend highly saturating a plant, allowing abundant water to seep out the bottom, while watering a plant in a pot without drainage, one needs to ensure that water sparingly and gradually, so the water gets evenly distributed through the soil without pooling at the bottom.

Create a drainage layer

A drainage layer is developed by adding a medium such as pebbles, stones or pumice to the bottom of a pot before adding soil. Soil particles are exceptionally tiny and tightly packed, which signals that water moves through them quite gradually. However, on the other hand, the more significant medium used to create a drainage layer has, comparatively a lot more space between them, which allows water to pass through briskly.

Adding a drainage layer permits excess water to get out of the soil more quickly and away from roots before they can be damaged is an ideal solution. Though the water is still in the pot, a drainage layer can provide a barrier between abundant water and the plant.

Useage of activated charcoal

One considers the incredible, suitable medium for a drainage layer is a product known as activated charcoal. Activated charcoal has been heated at high temperatures, which increases its naturally absorptive properties. This signals that a layer of activated charcoal at the bottom of your pot is usually able to remove some of that abundant water, which makes one’s plant exceptionally happy in the case of over-watering.

However, there is another issue that arises from over-watering is a fungal and bacterial disease. Activated charcoal has natural microbial properties, and none can deny that it can assist in deterring those harmful bugs.

How to Use Pots with No Drainage Holes

It is suggested by abundant experts that using a layer of pebbles as a sort of drainage layer in those pots without drainage holes. This technique permits significant water to flow into space with the rocks and letting them away from the soil and therefore, the roots of one’s plant. However, others find this a bit risky method, going so far as to call it a “myth,” saying that water has turbulence flowing between the two these different mediums and will, therefore, stay within the soil—even if pebbles are beneath it.

However, there is still a way to use those pretty pots that don’t possess drainage holes! Plant one’s plant in a porous pot with a suitable drainage hole, like the classic terracotta pot, and afterward place that pot within the larger decorative, no-drainage-hole container.

When it comes time to water, if the plant is small enough, you can take it out of its decorative pot and take advantage of the drainage hole. Unconventionally, one may place gravel or pebbles in the bottom of the decorative pot and place the functional pot with drainage on top of it. Under such a simple scenario, gravel can function to keep the plant’s roots away from sitting water. Furthermore, this setup never ever prohibits for ambient humidity, which is a boon to many plants.

It must be noted that pots without drainage holes should never be used outdoors where one’s plant will get rained on because none has no way of regulating the quantity of water one’s plant receives and retains.

So what are you wondering? Go ahead and use and celebrate those beautiful, stunning pots without drainage holes; however, one is supposed to do it cunningly and never at the expense of precious plants.

Why Drainage Holes are Essential

There are three paramount reasons that why drainage holes are essential: 1) they permit water to drain from the soil and through that, they enable 2) good airflow and 3) the flushing of salts from the soil.

Furthermore, plants that prefer a standard quality soaking and perpetually damp soil don’t prefer to have their feet wet. When roots sit in water for such a lengthy period, and when air is utterly prohibited from flowing freely (as in the case of saturated soil), then the plant can establish root rot, which is almost always an irreversible condition for the plant. In other words, plants soaking in water is one way to ensure their early demise.

Root rot caused by overly damp, poorly-draining soil can be a problem, especially for plants that enjoy moisture. One may have the volition to give succulents an abundant amount of water, but if there won’t is a place for the water to go, one might be gradually rotting its roots as mentioned above. However, there is another, less straightforward possibility as well: Knowing that one will not want their plant sitting in water and knowing that there’s no outlet for drainage. One might be overly cautious and never give the plant as much water as it desires.

For plants that adore more dry, dull soil, under-watering on purpose doesn’t seem to be much of a problem. However, then wet feet issue again. Plants that do not prefer a lot of moisture will be required to attain a drainage hole for moisture to escape and for airflow to circulate through the pot.

Another essential function of drainage holes is to permit water to flush the soil of abundant salts from fertilizers and never prohibit this thing to incur.

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